Eleana Bowman
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Best careers for INFJ personality types
Last updated: June 26, 2022
Eleana Bowman
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Best careers for INFJ personality types
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One of the smartest decisions you can make when choosing a career path is making that decision based on your personality type.

Why?

Because when you choose a career path that is well-suited to your personality, you’ll find greater fulfillment and happiness in your work life.

So, what does this all mean for the INFJ personality type?

In this article, we’ll look at what an INFJ is and how they function in the workplace. We’ll also tell you which jobs an INFJ personality type would be good at and which jobs they should avoid.


Not sure if you're an INFJ?

Follow these 2 steps to find the best job for your personality type:

  1. Find out your personality type for free on 16Personalities: take the free Personality Test

  2. Return to jobcase.com to visit our resource center and find the best jobs for your personality - it’s a great way to kick off the job search and discover the best match for your personality type!


What is the INFJ personality like?

The rarest personality type of all (making up just 1.5% of the population), INFJs are passionate, egalitarian, creative, and sensitive.

INFJs connect deeply with a sense of fairness, justice, and integrity, and they often make it their life’s mission to right the wrongs of the world. It’s for this reason that some Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI) tests refer to INFJs as ‘The Advocate.’

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INFJs tend to lead with their hearts and can be criticized for being overly idealistic. This is perhaps the greatest challenge for INFJs, who feel deeply about equality but are easily upset or stressed when met with criticism or conflict.

Strengths of the INFJ include:

  • Creativity

  • Passion

  • Altruism

  • Insightfulness

  • Communication

So, how does this personality type interact with their work environment?

The INFJ in the workplace

Being introverted, INFJs tend to thrive in more solitary roles where they can work behind the scenes.

Unsurprisingly, INFJs find more fulfillment working for companies that promote social good and positive change (such as mental health advocacy) or when employed by a non-profit.

Being intuitive personality types (much like INTP and INFP personalities), INFJs are highly open and have a strong need for their work to be future-focused.

They’ll do especially well if they work toward their goals in a structured and methodical manner, as they are also highly conscientious.

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As an introvert, the best career matches for INFJs are peaceful and laidback environments where they have space to explore their creativity and then enact actionable plans for change.

So, what do these career matches look like exactly?

What jobs are INFJs good at?

Let’s take a look at eight jobs that best fit an INFJ personality type.

1. Counselor or psychologist

An INFJ personality would thrive as a psychologist or counselor.

This career plays well into the INFJ’s need to help others and create positive change for humanity.

As introverts, INFJs tend to be more softly spoken and have great listening and communication skills, all of which are important in the clinical context.

INFJs are more likely to enjoy working in small private practices than large organizations due to both their introversion and their common distaste for corporate interest.

They may find that working as a counselor or psychologist in the public sphere (such as at a local women’s shelter) fits better with their altruistic needs instead of working in a position that is more focused on money.

Browse counselor jobs on Jobcase.

2. Writer

Many of the best INFJ career matches are ones where INFJs can work alone without the need for regular social interaction.

One way to meet this need is to pursue a career as a writer.

INFJs can choose to become creative writers, novelists, or poets, though these can be difficult jobs to make a lot of money doing.

A more attainable option (and one an INFJ can do while also pursuing other creative writing endeavors) is to work as a copywriter.

Copywriters often work from home (or tucked away in a quiet cafe or library), which bodes well for the INFJ’s introversion. Plus, they’ll be able to exercise their creative muscles to some degree in this role.

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Successful copywriters tend to focus on a specific niche, so a good fit for INFJs is to work on projects that promote social good or to write only for not-for-profit organizations and NGOs.

Browse copywriter jobs on Jobcase.

3. Human resources

Another great fit for The Advocate personality is a career in human resources.

HR representatives sit within a corporation and assist with a wide variety of employee-related matters.

They may be involved in hiring, training, and development, as well as performance management and dismissals.

One of the key roles of human resources is to represent and assist employees with work-related challenges.

For example, if an employee feels that their manager is treating them unfairly, the HR representative assists them in solving the problem.

This work can be very rewarding for the INFJ, who feels strongly about fairness, equality, and altruistic behavior.

Browse human resources jobs on Jobcase.

4. Teacher or professor

Teaching is one of the best careers for INFJ personalities who feel a strong need to help others on a one-to-one basis.

INFJs excel at creating and organizing lesson plans, and thanks to their feeling-type personality, they are able to empathize with struggling students.

As a teacher in large classrooms, INFJs may find themselves drained at the end of the day from so much social interaction.

For this reason, they may find it more rewarding to work as a special needs teacher where they have a smaller group of students to interact with on a daily basis.

Browse teacher jobs on Jobcase.

5. Graphic designer

Like writing, a career in graphic design can be a great solitary option for highly introverted INFJs.

Graphic designers tend to work alone or in small teams and use a combination of creativity and established structure (areas where the INFJ personality excels) to fulfill the needs of their company or clients.

Browse graphic designer jobs on Jobcase.

6. Librarian

Librarian is one of the best INFJ careers for those who are especially orderly. These personalities feel strongly that everything has a rightful place, so they’ll do well adhering to the Dewey Decimal System, which is used to organize books.

This is also a fairly solitary career choice, which is great for the especially introverted INFJ.

Browse librarian jobs on Jobcase.

7. Roles in healthcare

There are many great career choices for INFJs in healthcare.

A few examples include:

  • Occupational therapist

  • Nutritionist

  • Physical therapist

  • Public health educator

These are good options for INFJs who are passionate about health and well-being and enjoy working with people more than the typical INFJ (as this is a requirement in many healthcare positions).

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More reserved INFJs can still find fulfilling careers in healthcare, particularly if they are involved in healthcare policy or community health promotion programs.

Browse jobs in healthcare on Jobcase.

8. Roles in the sciences

Much like healthcare, the sciences offer a number of great opportunities for the altruistic INFJ.

INFJs who wish to identify and develop new ways to improve society may find an ideal career in one of these scientific areas:

The introverted aspect of the INFJ personality type makes lab-based careers a great choice. Their openness will also help them succeed in a science role because it allows INFJs to visualize many possible angles and formulate a hypothesis.

Browse science jobs on Jobcase.

What jobs should INFJs avoid?

There are many careers that INFJs should avoid.

Roles that don't allow INFJs to follow their moral compass will be challenging and lack job satisfaction. These roles may also cause high stress levels.

Careers that have deeply established power hierarchies can be a poor choice for the idealist INFJ, as are people-intensive positions that are better suited for more extroverted personality types.

Lastly, many INFJs are fairly creative, and although they can be hard-working and industrious, they may prefer roles with a degree of variety as opposed to repetitive careers.

What majors are good for INFJs?

Are you an INFJ wanting to pursue a degree but wondering what to major in?

The best majors for INFJs are ones that allow them to explore their desire to change the world for the better.

Good examples include:

  • Psychology

  • Nursing

  • Speech-language pathology

  • Social work

  • Criminal justice and criminology

  • Counseling Psychology

Not all INFJ careers require college degrees. Some of the examples we discussed above (such as a writer or librarian) are jobs that don’t typically have strict educational requirements.

Do any of these INFJ careers sound like you?

Choosing a career path can be daunting.

And if you’ve already established yourself in the workforce and you’re looking to shake things up with a career change, this decision can be even more challenging.

However, if you choose a role that best suits your INFJ personality, you’ve got a pretty good shot at finding long-term fulfillment and enjoyment in your chosen career.

So, what are you waiting for?

Get started today by checking out the awesome job opportunities on Jobcase.

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